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Mike Bryant
Mike Bryant
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We Need to Keep Children Safe Around Windows

4 comments

A new study by the journal Pediatrics found more than 5,000 kids – five years of age and under – is treated in U.S. emergency rooms after falling out a window.

According to the research, most accidents involved falls from first-floor and second-floor windows of homes, not high-rise apartment buildings. And, the falls tend to happen most during the summer months when windows are left open more frequently.

Most of the injured children – boys were more prevalent than girls – suffered injuries to the face and head. An estimated 1,000 cases were fatal.

The study was based on data collected from 1990-2008 and found an estimated 98,415 children were treated for window fall-related injuries in the U.S., or close to 5,200 kids per year.

Children are curious by nature and want to check things out. They don’t know that an open window is a danger with severe consequences, said study co-author Dr. Gary Smith director of the Center for Injury Research.

Preventing Window Falls

Most importantly, avoid placing furniture near windows where young children can climb.

Window guards and window stops should be installed on all windows that are located on the 6th floor and below, according to the CPSC.

Window guards prevent children from falling out the window.

Install window stops so the window opens no more than 4 inches.

Screens will NOT prevent a child from falling out the window.

For renters, check local regulations as some jurisdictions require landlords to install window guards.

Supervise children to prevent them from playing near balconies, windows or patio doors.

Find out more by visiting the National Safety Council’s Window Safety Task Force.

4 Comments

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  1. Schaffhausen says:
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    I am reminded about industry trends of the sixties and nineties for the automotive industry, where seat belts and air bags were required by law to be installed, respectively. The issue that I have with the window industry is that the current laws focus on amending or adding third party products to windows to aid in reducing the number of children falling from open windows. Although, my business stands to gain from having consumers purchase a third party device, it is not manditory that the consumers must purchase these devices. What will it take to go after the window manufacturers to incorporate these simple safety features into thier products?

    I invented a window locking device as a third party add on but I want to take the next step by incorporating the device into the design of the window. However, funding for this next venture is scarce and the topic is not thought of as a high priority to current manufacturers or consumers (since the number of instances is relatively low by some commenters, myself NOT included).

  2. Mike Bryant says:
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    Very interesting and helpful information. I would be very interested in learning more about your product and what it does. Thanks for reading and the comment.

  3. Schaffhausen says:
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    Mike,

    So that others may view the site as well, here is the web page.

    http://www.wind-o-lock.com

    I designed a lock that will lock a sliding window or sliding door in an open position. Currently most sliding doors/windows only lock in a closed position. However, what if you wanted to open the window at night or while you are away for the day, just to get some fresh air in the house without the added worrying?

    John

  4. Mike Bryant says:
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    Very interesting link. I will look at it and write more. Have you talked to any of the big window people like Anderson?